Anthony J. Jannetti “Tony” Award

"Tony" Award For Extraordinary Contributions to Health Care

This award has been established in honor of Anthony J. Jannetti in recognition of the support he has provided to the profession of nursing and to the formation of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses (AMSN).

The purpose of this award is to recognize the extraordinary contributions of a nurse towards the enhancement of health care and is presented to an individual who promotes excellence in medical-surgical nursing through activities in research, education, and practice.

2015


Jane E. Lacovara, RN, MSN, CMSRN, CNS-BC, and
Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, FRCN, FAAN, at the
2015 AMSN Annual Convention.


Taken at an AMSN Annual Convention.

AMSN is pleased to have presented the 2015 Anthony J. Jannetti Award ("Tony" Award) to Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, FRCN, FAAN.

Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing, Professor of Sociology, and Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

The recipient of this award:

  • Promotes excellence in medical-surgical nursing care through clinical practice, research, education or administration;
  • Enhances the image of the profession of nursing;   
  • Advances health care thru effective communication
  • Demonstrates leadership through implementation of creative strategies and innovations.
  • And is recognized as an outstanding nursing leader.

Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, FAAN, FRCN is the Director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, and The Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor of Nursing and Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Dr. Aiken conducts research on the health care workforce and quality of healthcare in the U.S. and globally. She co-directs RN4CAST, a European Union funded study of nurse workforce and quality of care in 12 European countries, China, and South Africa.

Her funded NIH research has received numerous awards including the Individual Codman Award from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations for leadership utilizing performance measures to demonstrate relationships between nursing care and patient outcomes.

She was honored with the Academy Health Distinguished Investigator Award, the William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research, and the Episteme Award from Sigma Theta Tau International.

Dr. Aiken is a former President of the American Academy of Nursing, Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing, a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Teaching

Dr. Aiken teaches undergraduate and graduate level courses that delve into current issues in health and social policy and health outcomes research in both nursing and sociology. She also directs an NIH-funded pre- and post-doctoral research training program in health outcomes research.

Research

Linda H. Aiken is an authority on causes, consequences, and solutions for nurse shortages in the United States and around the world. Dr. Aiken leads the International Hospital Outcomes Consortium studying the impact of nursing on patient outcomes in 13 countries, and directed the Nursing Quality Improvement Program in Russia and Armenia demonstrating the successful application of twinning initiatives in nursing to improve hospital quality.

She is a member of the Expert Advisory Panel guiding the World Alliance for Patient Safety. She is a leading expert on global nurse migration, its consequences, and solutions in developing and developed countries. Her research is frequently cited by the press, and she is winner of three American Academy of Nursing Media Awards.

Currently Funded Grants

Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research

Clinical Practice

Dr. Aiken is interested in medical-surgical nursing, AIDS care, and care for serious mental illness.

Honors/Credentials

Dr. Aiken is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow and former president of the American Academy of Nursing, an Honorary Fellow in the Royal College of Nursing of the United Kingdom, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Recent awards acknowledging Dr. Aiken's significant contributions to health outcomes research include the following:

  • Elected Theodore Roosevelt Fellow, American Academy of Political & Social Science, 2002
  • Barbara Thoman Curtis Award 2002, American Nurses Association
  • Baxter Episteme Research Award 2001, Sigma Theta Tau International
  • Distinguished Pathfinder Research Award 2001, Friends of National Institute of Nursing Research
  • Media Award 2001, American Academy of Nursing
  • William B. Graham Prize for Health Services Research, Baxter International Foundation and Association of University Programs in Health Administration, 2006
  • Distinguished Investigator Award, AcademyHealth, 2005
  • Raymond and Beverly Sackler Award for Sustained National Leadership in Health Research, Research!America, March 21, 2006
  • Article-of-the-Year Award for best health services research article, AcademyHealth, 2003 for “Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, nurse burnout, and job dissatisfaction,” JAMA 288/16;1987-1993, 2002.
  • Individual Ernest A. Codman Award, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, 2003
  • Media Award, American Academy of Nursing, 2004, for press coverage of “Hospital Staff Nurse Work Hours and Patient Safety” Health Affairs, 23(4):202-212, July, 2004.
  • Media Award, American Academy of Nursing, 2003 for press coverage of “Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, nurse burnout, and job dissatisfaction”
  • Media Award, American Academy of Nursing, 2001, for press coverage of “Nurses’ Reports on Hospital Quality in Five Countries”.

Her policy research agenda is motivated by a commitment to improving health care outcomes by building an evidence base for health services management and providing direction for national policymakers. Dr. Aiken’s Center’s program of international outcomes research deals with the impact of modifiable organizational attributes on patient outcomes and workplace stability in hospitals, causes and consequences of, and solutions for, cyclical nurse shortages, and managerial innovations such as magnet hospitals.

Congratulations, Dr. Aiken!

2014


L to R  Kathleen Lattavo, MSN, RN, CNS-MS,
CMSRN, RN-BC, ACNS-BC, and Michael R. Bleich,
PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, at the 2014 AMSN Annual
Convention
.


Taken at an AMSN Annual Convention.

AMSN is pleased to have presented the 2014 Anthony J. Jannetti Award ("Tony" Award) to Michael R. Bleich, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN.

Michael R. Bleich, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is the Maxine Clark and Bob Fox Dean and Professor at The Goldfarb School of Nursing at Barnes Jewish College and Vice President for BJC Healthcare in St. Louis, Missouri (Barnes Jewish).

Prior to his position at Goldfarb School of Nursing, Dr. Bleich was at the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing (OHSU) where he served as Dr. Carol A. Lindeman distinguished professor of nursing, dean, school of nursing and vice provost for inter-professional education and development  (AJN).

Previously, Dr. Bleich was at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., where he served as associate dean and professor, clinical and community affairs for the school of nursing; chair and professor, department of health policy and management for the school of medicine; and chief operating officer/chief executive officer for KU Health Partners  (Barnes Jewish).

Dr. Bleich attended the St. Luke’s Hospital School of Nursing in Racine, Wis. and earned his BSN at Milton College in Milton, Wis. (Barnes Jewish).  Dr. Bleich holds a Master of Public Health from the University of Minnesota and a PhD in Human Resource Development from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Barnes Jewish).

Dr. Bleich’s areas of expertise focus on inter-professional leadership development, academic-service workforce development, strategic alignment of academic clinical enterprises, and analytics related to quality improvement to enhance practice and academic outcomes  (AJN).

Dr. Bleich is a nationally recognized speaker on nursing trends and issues. He also holds numerous awards and honors, including the 2011 Luther Christman Award by the American Assembly for Men in Nursing given for meritorious service to the role of men in nursing and service to the profession.

Dr. Bleich was the only dean of nursing to serve on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee that issued the 2011 IOM Report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health: Milestone and Challenges in Expanding Nursing Science  (Barnes Jewish).

Dr. Bleich traveled the country speaking to numerous organizations about the Future of Nursing report.  He has emphasized the importance of interdisciplinary work and inclusivity in the process of providing care to patients.  He is a strong advocate for evidence-based practice and the role of nursing research in providing the foundation for the practice of nursing.

Dr. Bleich’s work with the Future of Nursing Report brought him to the 2011 AMSN annual convention. While Michael shared the IOM process and recommendations with the convention attendees, he had a profound impact on the AMSN Board of Directors.  Michael’s comments about the work of the Board and his encouragement was critical in the Board’s decision to commission research to investigate the scope of practice for the medical surgical nurse.

Dr. Bleich has demonstrated a strong commitment to nursing and the professional issues impacting nurses of today and the future.

He has been influential within the association as AMSN seeks to define the practice of nursing in the future.

Dr. Bleich demonstrates the criteria and would be a worthy recipient of the Anthony Jannetti award. 

Related Information

2013


L to R  Mary Naylor PhD, RN, FAAN and Dee
Eldardiri, MS, RN-BC, CMSRN at an AMSN Annual
Convention
.


Taken at an AMSN Annual Convention.

AMSN is pleased to have presented the 2013 Anthony J. Jannetti Award ("Tony" Award) to Mary Naylor PhD, RN, FAAN.

Mary is currently the Marian S. Ware Professor in Gerontology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She is an internationally renowned nursing scholar and leader regarding discharge planning and transitioning patients from the acute care environment to home or other living arrangements.

Since 1989, Dr. Naylor has led an interdisciplinary program of research designed to improve outcomes and reduce costs of care for vulnerable community-based elders.

To date, Dr. Naylor and her research team have completed three National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)-funded randomized clinical trials focusing on discharge planning and home follow-up of high-risk elders by advanced practice nurses.

In addition, Dr. Naylor currently has several grants funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence underway.

She is without question the foremost leader among researchers examining transitional care from the hospital to a variety of other settings.

Dr. Naylor is the recipient of numerous awards to include:

  • American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Policy Luminary Award
  • Edward Henderson Award and State-of-the-Art Lecture, American Geriatrics Society
  • Frances Payne Bolton Award, Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research
  • Claire Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing
  • Nursing Research Award, Heart Failure Society of America
  • Outstanding Alumna Award, Univ. of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing
  • Nightingale Award of Pennsylvania for Nursing Research
  • Nursing Research Award, Pennsylvania Nurses Association

Additionally, she is a Fellow in the Institute of Medicine, The National Academies and a member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. 

She serves on a number of national advisory committees and has provided testimony to the US Senate and House of Representatives. She has authored over 50 journal articles appearing in refereed healthcare journals, as well as numerous book chapters.

Dr. Naylor also is a reviewer for numerous healthcare journals and she holds memberships in a variety of nursing and healthcare professional scientific societies.

Dr. Naylor graduated from Villanova University in Villanova, PA with a BSN in Nursing. She worked as a clinical nurse and then became a nurse manager at Bryn Mawr Hospital in Bryn Mawr PA. Dr. Naylor subsequently taught nursing at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia; during that time she also earned her Master’s degree and Doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania.

She joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in 1986, where she is now the Director of NewCourtland Center for Transitions and Health at the School of Nursing.

Dr. Naylor also has received numerous prestigious fellowships, such as the:

  • W. K. Kellogg National Leadership Fellowship; U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, Washington DC
  • Legislative Health Policy Fellowship; Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

She is currently a Senior Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics of the University of Pennsylvania.

Congratulations, Mary!

2012

The Anthony J. Jannetti Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Health Care: “The Tony Award”AMSN is pleased to have presented the 2012 Anthony J. Jannetti Award ("Tony" Award) to Marlene Kramer, PhD, RN, FAAN.

Marlene received her BSN from St. Louis University in 1953, her MSN from Case-Western Reserve University (1958), and her PhD in education and sociology from Stanford University (1966).

She has held a variety of positions in Nursing Service and has been a member of the faculty of three Schools of Nursing, University of California in San Francisco, University of Connecticut, and University of Nevada, Reno where she was the first occupant of the Orvis Chair in Nursing Research.

In the late 1960s, while Dean of the Undergraduate program at the University of California, San Francisco, Marlene commenced a Research Program to identify the process, facilitators, and deterrents to effective transition of students to the work world.

This study led to the publication in 1974 of her seminal work Reality Shock: Why Nurses Leave Nursing. From 1974-1979, Marlene focused on avenues to alleviate Reality Shock in acute care hospitals and conducted a series of studies to test Bicultural and Conflict Resolution training with new graduate nurses and their head nurses to help ease the school to work transition.

While Dean at the University of Connecticut, Marlene was motivated by the Magnet Hospital publication to begin a program of research on institutions of excellence in nursing care. Since 1984, and continuing today, her program of research has identified those factors present in hospitals that create a healthy and productive practice environment.

The information generated by this series of research studies is helpful to organizations in assessing the state of their practice environment and then to plan approaches to increase the quality of that environment.

Based on her nursing expertise and known international reputation, she is an ideal recipient of the Anthony J. Jannetti Award for Extraordinary Contributions to Health Care.

Congratulations, Marlene!

Find out more about the Anthony J. Jannetti “Tony” Award.